Posts Tagged ‘HO’

Service is now running from the village sub-terra station to the mine.

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The futuristic turbo train departs for the mines of Xenon on Rich Erwin’s sci-fi model railroad

I’m writing a mixed-bag status update today. I’ve painted and put in place, at least temporarily, the passenger line from the village to the mine. The configuration is a loop and the plan is to have a station at the mine (underground, hewn out of rock, etc.) to the “village” where miners live and the extracted minerals are processed and loaded for shipment.

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Overview of The Mines of Xenon science fiction model railroad

 

The village station (approximately where the turbo train is in the picture above) will be a “sub-terra” (that is, subway) station, also within rock.  Available space will determine the size of the stations, but I’d like to have a pretty substantial one as in my practice diorama.

This is the steel track included in the Tyco Turbo Train set plus a couple of extra pieces I surprisingly found in my scrap box. The steel is used because the Turbo Train uses magnets to maintain contact with the track. I painted the passenger line white to set it off visually from the freight line. I’m also considering using the vertical spacers that come with the train set to make it appear more like an elevated passenger track. I think the contrast is nice, but I still have to paint the re-railer / power section which is a bit quirky.

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I’m getting ready to do some body work on the diesel roster. I have a box full of shells (most of which are courtesy of Jack Hess of the “Colony 5” work in Railroad Model Craftsman) and I am quite enjoying stripping the paint off. Just soaking 2-3 days in 91% alcohol and scrub with a toothbrush. Jack had already started some work, and I continue to imagine what a heavily kitbashed alien engine might look like.

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Remember, the layout depicts the early hours after the AI mechs are attacking and the humans must scrounge for raw materials for protection. Think Mad Max style trains. The idea is that I will take the bodies of disparate engine styles and cram them together for something that is recognizable, yet foreign. This could be fun if I don’t stress and let the process come.

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A secondary technique is to leave the paint bubbled as a weathering effect. I’m looking forward to using this in the future, but for now I’m stripping everything off.

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Next up is ballasting. Again I wanted something familiar, yet different. Typical model railroad ballast would be just too ordinary. I considered kitty litter or aquarium pebbles. A little research and I thought both those items would be too large for HO scale (but probably acceptable if nothing else could be found).

I’m pursuing using construction sand that I snagged from a friend. It comes from a big box store and I got about two pounds worth. I dried it out and the sample seemed to have a pinkish hue. I had in my mind something darker and more red. So I painted it. I simply dropped some of the same paint from the baseboard stage and mixed in a red party cup. Let that dry and voila!

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Dried construction sand on the left, painted sand on the right

 

The sand clumps slightly as it dries, which turns out is a nice effect. The grains themselves are a bit small for a ballast (although who knows what they use on Xenon 3!) so the larger clumps work out nicely.

I’m happy with the results and think I’m going to go with the painted sand. This turns out to be quite a versatile and cheap method. You don’t need very much paint and I guess acrylic would work as well as the latex house paint.

I ballasted two small sections of track – one with the original sand and one with the painted. I’ll have my little helper give the final verdict with a little input from dad.

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Finally I’d like to share a nice little find. I was looking for plastic containers to hold the diesel shell parts (window glazing, handrails, horns) while stripping paint. I went strolling down the aisles of my local grocery story and found some cheap lunch containers with sections. Neato and I think I’ll be using these again and again for various projects to come.

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So now it is on to installing a couple of bridges and securing the ballast and track.

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Work has begun in earnest on filling the swamp. I had already coated the bottom with joint compound, sanded and painted it. Light green on the outside, blending to a black in the middle represent depth.

I had also fashioned a couple of industrial pipes from PVC and a prescription pill bottle and added toxic drainage. A how-to video by Wyloch can be see here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S07hHjXgd60

Now it was time to add some detail to the area. I cut a dollar-store toy dinosaur in half for the “swamp monster” emerging from the pool of blech at the waterline. Paintbrush bristles and Noch static grass were glued in to represent whatever type of wild reed grows on Xenon 3. I also added part of toy dinosaur skeleton tail.

Next I poured the resin. About 20oz of both resin and hardener were enough to lay down a layer of about 1/4″ inch thick. I let it cure and harden at least 48 hours.

Next comes the magic. The resin dries incredibly clear. Every fault from the plaster and paint can be clearly seen.  The resin, as poured, needs some texture and color variation to get the light to play and bounce. This can be achieved by adding some acrylic paint to the resin pour, but it was too late for that now (note to self: add some color to the resin next time. Fluorescent or glow in the dark?)

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I remembered technique of making water of nothing but coats of Mod Podge by long time Model Railroader Magazine contributor Dave Frary. The effect is stunning and explained on Dave’s Youtube page here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wnOE-qWhGVs

Even though the effect of building up the coast of Mod Podge is amazing, the bottom layer of paint also counts for a lot as well. Again, a lesson for the main layout, but now time to start laying down the layers. As the video states, blotching is key. Thicker layers are better, but tend to cause air bubbles, which destroy the effect.

This is a fun task where you can get a little help from your assistant. You can do at least 1 coat a day, two for the thinner ones.

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On the backside of the diorama, which is the underground sub station, I started placing in the various elements, The platform and bulkhead are basically finished. I tested coloring the ties white to differentiate the passenger line. I made some other pieces out of sci fi gaming textures from the Internet. I still need to add some details to get a grungy, sci-fi, post apocalyptic feel, as well as a futuristic train or locomotive, low level lighting, and passengers on the platform.

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Over on the main layout, it is time to start laying track. I have put in place the cornerstone pieces (basically the switches) which will key the placement of the rest of the track. There will 5 electrical blocks (standard DC block wiring), so I mocked in some curves and identified where the feeders will need to be.

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I drilled the holes and will start laying the track for real next week. Soon trains will be running on the Mines of Xenon!

 

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Rich Erwin freshens up the Southside Industrial District and addresses some nagging scenery issues

 

So, after a house move and some space prep, the time had come to clean things up a bit. I wanted to fix a couple of dings as a result of the move, enhance and correct some benchwork, and  tackle a couple of nagging issues with the scenery (paved areas).

First the benchwork. I reassembled the layout on its base legs. Since the new space isn’t finished yet, I had a pretty good inkling that I would be moving the layout a fair amount while things got sorted out. I turned the layout over, being carful to damage as little of the scenery as possible. Then I added 1/4″ center post casters I picked up from a big box home construction store. Flipped the layout back over and we were ready to go. The locking casters made a big improvement and maybe my best move yet.

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The District in its new space with rolling casters and an upgraded backdrop

 

Next up was the backdrop. For whatever reason, the current backdrop had about 1/2″ gap down the center. I don’t know if I originally measured wrong or what, but it had been like that for 3 or 4 years. Now was the time to fix it. I got a new 8′ section of 1/4″ Masonite and cut it to fit. It was long enough for a single piece to span the length of the back of the layout. I attached 1×3″ bracing to the back with Gorilla glue and painted the smooth side the same sky blue as the side boards. I attached it with clamps and drilled holes to match the existing holes in the frame. One quarter inch bolts with washers and wing nuts secured the backdrop to the benchwork frame.

On the backdrop I use photos of real scenes to fill the space between buildings. I still had the original backdrop and reference photos, so I peeled the photos off the backdrop and re-affixed them to the new backdrop. Another step done.

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Painting the backdrop

 

 

The sidewalks at the back of the layout needed attention, so that was my first modeling chore. It was pretty straightforward. I use .060″ styrene cut to fit for the raised sidewalks. and I scribed in expansion marks every 1 inch. I then added curbstones with a width of 1cm, rounded the corners at the intersections, and beveled for crosswalks and driveways. I follow that up with spray painting the sidewalkes with textured sandstone. I carved in some cracks and applied a dark wash for weathering (and to bring out the detail) which completes the work before I glue it in place.

On to the pavement issues. The paved areas consist of several materials. Most was either painted styrene or cardstock. At one point I used thin black card which was essentially black poster board without a sealed surface. This was mostly used in the Du Pont area. In an Georgia garage with no climate control, this thin and unsealed stock had warped in a few places, especially around the track rail. Also, on the west (left) side, there was no pavement under the track or up even with the railheads.

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Pavement redo with styrene at Du Pont

 

First on the list was the cardstock at Du Pont. I pulled the paper layer off, being careful to preserve the shape as a template for the new material. The bottom layer, even with the top of the ties, remained. I used a .030″ styrene stock and traced the piece of card on the styrene and cut to fit. I sprayed a base coat of black primer and then highlighted areas with gray to represent traffic patterns. I added some arrows and street markings with oil pastels and traffic templates (made for UK roads). Of the three sections, I replaced the two closest to the front of the layout and left the back section intact, as it is mostly hidden and in the best shape.

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Finished Du Pont section complete with road markings. Note the weathering indicating traffic patterns.

 

The paving on the west section was next. I did some research and wanted to try some differing techniques to see which provided better results. Three sections to process (plus between the rails), so for each I would try a different material. On the back section by Sylvan Foods, I used black foam core with the paper backing removed after soaking in water. The pieces were cut to fit and sanded. The resulting texture was a nice rough one, simulating a paved surface.

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Plaster used to fill in the space between spurs on the west end of the Southside Industrial District. Wax paper and painters’ tape protect the track work.

 

For the area between the tracks of National Transfer and Storage and Sylvan Foods, I took a page from the old-school plaster playbook. I needed 1/10 of an inch, plus the height of the ties, for code 100 track, so I applied in layers, let dry, sand, repeat. Finally I painted a coat of black/gray acryllic mix and added some chalk for weathering. This took a couple of weeks not necessarily would I call it messy, but I did feel that doing each layer was burdensome – having to repeat the cycle of wait and sand, wait and sand.

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Weights assure a good bond for the foam core paving onto the benchwork top

 

Finally back to foam core for the base under the National Transfer and Storage. I made it a little larger and shaped and sanded to fit the existing access road.

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The completed scene includes pavement made out of five different materials: card stock, foam core, styrene, craft foam, and plaster

 

So now these nagging little projects are done, I can get on to the next thing. We often forget that track is scenery, too, and with just this little bit of effort, the layout feels more complete, and has a more finished appearance. On to detailing the city!

Mine Wars and Little Girls

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Pink Panther or model railroader?

 

The genesis of the next railroad was birthed today. So far, I’ve come up with “Mine Wars: Descent below Xenon 3”. I’ve taken the concept of the 50’s mining layout and blown it up.

The year is 2154 on the planet Xenon 3. Humanity has set up a base there mining unobtanium (ha!), which has been highly automated. Machines augmented with artificial intelligence do most of the work. Eventually, the machines grew too clever and turned on the humans. The railroad models the first days after the automaton androids have taken over the mining base. The pre-programmed mining cars and loads continue to run while the humans fight to gain control back from the robots.

For a while now I’ve wanted to do an apocalyptic themed railroad, but could never bring it all together. The ideas have started to gel, so let’s go for it.

The setting will be a Mars-like red desert planet of the future. A mining operation will be the key scene, with a processing plant and possible urban lodging area (think miner’s quarters). Continuous running loop in a sci-fi space setting featuring droids will add interest. Maybe some robots chasing humanoids as they try to escape the planet.

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From A Look at Futuristic Modeling, Apr 1978 Model Railroader magazine.                               Photo: Model Railroader

Inspiration so far has come from various sources. 1. “A look at Futuristic Modeling” in the April 78 edition of Model Railroader. 2. Model Railroaders Eagle Mountain project railroad starting in November 2015, especially for the topography. 3. Laurie Calvert’s sic-fi inspired ‘Clash at North Ridge’ from Model Rail magazine (US) online message boards. 4. Scenery modules and accessories I’ve recently discovered for table top role playing fantasy games.

 

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Clash at North Ridge   Photo: Laurie Calvert

 

Features I’d like to include:
* Space themed distance planet setting
* Loads in / empties out mine and processing plant
* HO standard gauge track with continuous run loop
* built for exhibition
* undefined scale
* extruded foam-based scenery
* cheap (but dependable) components modified for space theme
* DC power; possibly an auto-reversing circuit on the mine run
* learning opportunities for my 8-year old daughter
* Lots of kitsch and heavy on the sci-fi
* fun, fun, fun!

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Photo: Model Railroader magazine

 

I was so motivated, already this afternoon I ran out to the home supply store and scored a 4×8′ piece of extruded foam, with help from my daughter. Now the research starts to get a track plan, accessory parts and pull it all together. The idea is not to think too much and have some fun playing.

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testing the track

 

2015 Progress 1

Southside Industrial District in shadowbox relief.

When 2015 started, I had three major goals to achieve for my HO industrial switching layout.

  • Create a shadow box (or proscenium) arch valence for the front of the layout benchwork
  • Convert an old Athearn diesel switcher to battery powered radio control
  • Build a cardstock model of the UK Underground station at Morden

I am pleased to say I made major progress on two, while considering the proscenium arch completed. Scroll down through the blog to see construction articles. More on the London Underground coming in 2016!

The proscenium arch

Southside Arch

Full frontal industrial switching

Battery powered radio control switcher

2015 Progress 2

Southside Industrial SW1500 #703 works the Dupont plant on the edge of the District

Radio control installed and working, but still some work to do on the shell – hand rails and weathering.

Morden Underground Station (OO Scale)

2015 Progress 3

Morden Station on the Northern Line of the UK Underground

While the bulk of Morden station is complete, I’d say the entire diorama is maybe 40% complete. I still have detailing to do like street markings, figures and general clutter. I’m also going add a couple of levels below grade to show some underground passenger service.

Rather ambitious, but I hope to get it done with a little help from my friends.

Beatles test with Morden Station

Zebra crossing dress rehersal.

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Southside Industrial District proscenium arch

My modeling career has followed the trajectory of what I feel is common to many American modelers. I inherited my brother’s Christmas train set that was an oval on a sheet of 4×8 plywood. The 4×8 doubled, and was eventually replaced by a 10’ x 12’ basement empire, all by the time I was the ripe old age of 20. Then real life showed up and I was off to college to seek my fortune. Family and career followed as my models were put away, only to collected dust for several years.

Becoming a home owner allowed me to dig out the old boxes from my parents’ basement a few years ago. I secured a section of a spare room, dusted the cobwebs off the old rolling stock and set up a small industrial switching layout, which I call the Southside Industrial District (follow my blog at http://www.smallurbanrails.wordpress.com).

During the active periods of railroading in my life, I did the typical: grew a rolling stock and locomotive fleet, practiced scenery, learned wiring, and honed my modeling skills. Beyond ground cover and weathering, I paid little attention to presentation of the layout as a whole. Saw horses and visible dimensional lumber were good enough for me. I tacked on a few sheets of paneling to the benchwork and called it a day.

Lately, I’ve begun to think of how the layout exists in its environment in total. Lighting, fascia, sight lines, skirting and experiencing the layout in its entirety all contribute to this thing I am calling presentation.

Presentation

The Southside Industrial District was originally housed in a 28” x 88” closet (thus its dimensions, which are the same, even until today).

I left the light on in the closet one afternoon and returned later in the evening to a darkened room. The HO scale skyline of the Southside popped out of the darkness. I decided then and there I wanted to eventually maximize the effect for my visitors even if now wasn’t the right time.

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Humble beginnings in the closet for my HO Southside Industrial District switching layout

Later, the railroad was moved to function outside the closet as a stand-alone module, moving from room to room until eventually finding a home in our new garage / studio space. Still resting on saw horses, the time had come to raise the rail height, create dedicated legs, and add a theatre-style shadow box to the front.

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Switching layout without a home gets moved from room to room during construction

It was time for the proscenium arch.

The American Way

Until recently, most US modelers have given little attention to presentation. Layouts are built as permanent structures, often bolted to the wall. If you want to see your friend’s layout, you go over to his house and head down to the basement.

In UK and Europe, things progress differently, I would guess mainly due to stricter space constraints as compared to the US. First of all, layouts tend to be smaller on average. Other countries simply don’t have the space per person the build pikes the size of their American counterparts.

Layout on a Ironing Board byPaul Allen Academey Modellers

Paul Allen’s British themed Ingleton Sidings is built on an ironing board and features a shadow box display. http://ingletonsidings.com/hornby-magazine-photos/

Second, the layouts are built as stand alone entities and not merely as a club NTrak or Free-Mo module to be assembled at a meet. Layouts are crafted to function and stand (literally) by themselves. You can see this in the work of British author Iain Rice, modeler Paul Allen and his Ingleton Sidings layout, and others.

A possible third reason as to why Americans build their train layouts with different priorities is that in other countries, I would guess there is a higher participation rate at train shows. Often you’ll find several 1- or 2-man layouts side by side from different scales, eras, locales, and themes. No attempt is made to connect them as the Americans would in order to see who can run the longest train.

Smaller layouts standing on their own need to emphasize presentation.

Styles of Presentation

“Picture Frame”, “shadowbox”, “theater-style”, and even “proscenium arch” are all words used to describe ways of framing your layout in a box to maximize and control how users experience your models. There are a couple of different approaches to making your master creation stand out in its surroundings by using one of these styles.

Southside Industrial Model Railroader Olympia Logging

Model Railroader Video Plus’ Olympia Logging layout stands in shadowbox relief behind producer David Popp (subscription required) http://mrv.trains.com/how-to/modeling/2014/04/olympia-logging-series-part-1—display-style-design

The simplest might be what I refer to as the “picture frame” method. This is the method I’ve chosen for my own layout and describe in more detail below. It consists simply of creating a picture-type frame to frame the layout and adding it to the front fascia. A good example of this is the recent Olympia logging layout from Model Railroader Video Plus, a joint venture with Model Railroader Magazine. Their video website has a good tutorial on how to add a picture frame to a presentation layout.

Geoff Nott’s Leigh Creek On3 Layout

Geoff Nott’s Leigh Creek On3 Layout Carl Arendt’s Small Layout Scrapbook http://www.carendt.com/small-layout-scrapbook/page-95a-march-2010/

 

Another way to do it is with an overhang, or valance, in which the top of the front frame hangs over the front of layout by a few inches and usually houses a lighting fixture. This way, the light can shine down onto the front of the layout. Iain Rice is a big proponent of this method and you can see in almost any of his track plans. Even his book Shelf Layouts for Model Railroads (2009, Kalmbach Publishing) has a diagram on the cover.

Shelf Layouts for Model Railroads by Iain Rice

Shelf Layouts for Model Railroads by Iain Rice

Larger home and club layouts often have a permanent valence attached to the ceiling which controls lighting and sight lines. There are also museum type displays which can be quite extravagant. Some may even include a model railroad as a portion of a larger theme, as in Banco Popular’s light rail tram proposal for Puerto Rico by Smartt Inc. and Estudio Interlinea.

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Estudio Interlinea’s On Tracks exhibition demonstrates the benefits of adding tram light rail to Puerto Rico. An HO model railroad is the centerpiece of the exhibition. http://estudiointerlinea.com/archives/167

Do an internet search to get an idea of the variety of styles and see which is right for your circumstances. Of recent note in the hobby press is the aforementioned Olympia layout as well as the High Line featured in Kalmbach’s Great Model Railroads 2015.

Brooklyn: 3am

Brooklyn: 3am Carl Arendt Small Layout Scrapbook http://www.carendt.com/small-layout-scrapbook/page-87-july-2009/

Brooklyn 3am by a man whose internet handle is “Prof Klyzlr”, is another great layout that takes all aspects of presentation into consideration. You can see an excellent discussion of the Prof’s layout at Carl Arendt’s Micro Layouts website. Pay special attention to the treatment of the entire “feel” of the layout including sights, sounds, and animation. This is one layout that continues to inspire my modeling and motivated me to consider this project of adding a proscenium arch to enhance my visitors’ experience of my model railroad.

Brooklyn: 3am http://www.carendt.com/small-layout-scrapbook/page-95a-march-2010/

Brooklyn: 3am from Carl Arendt’s Small Layout Scrapbook website

Framing the Southside Industrial District

I chose to build my shadowbox as a flat-on, picture-frame style. The layout was already built and operational with backdrops on three sides. The backdrop and “sidedrops” were already in place, so I had to work within those constraints. I chose to put a “flat” window on the front, framing the railroad for maximum impact.

The layout had been moved about frequently as sat on a pair of saw hourses, so the first step at hand was to raise the layout height and give it its own legs. I followed standard practices of 2×2 legs braced with 1×2 cross members. These were attached to the 1×4 cross pieces of the frame of the layout with ¼” carriage bolts for a semi-permanent installation. A 1×4 brace at the bottom of each leg structure provided additional support as well as a support planking to create some storage shelving.

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I chose 3/16” plywood as my fascia material. The window “frame” had to be strong enough to hold its own weight, yet sturdy enough so it wouldn’t sag or buckle. The frame would be attached to the 1×4 members of the layout frame. There would be no cross bracing from the frame to the backdrop for added support.

I first measured my stock plywood to match the width of the front of the layout and the height of the already existing side drops. After cutting to size, I clamped the stock in place to the front of the layout. Then I drilled ¼” holes for carriage bolts. The bolts are used to secure the frame as well as index for position. As with the leg assemblies, I used carriage bolts so the frame can be removed for layout transport or maintenance.

Next I cut the opening using a jigsaw. While the plywood was attached to the railroad, I marked the height of the sub roadbed against the plywood from the inside. I also marked space at the top for my lighting fixture with some added clearance. I used that same measurement (4 inches) to mark the width of the sides of my arch.

Test fitting the front fascia shadow box

Test fitting the front fascia shadow box

Now a box “window” was marked on the plywood stock. I found a plastic lid from the kitchen to round the edges to give a softer feel to the viewing window. It was about 24” inches diameter or maybe a little more. It doesn’t really matter as long as you’re happy with the results. Find something that works for you.

With the window marked out, I used a saber saw to make a doughnut hole in the board. The cut was mostly free hand, although you may wish to use a straight edge on the longer sections. I painted the front side with a flat black latex-based house paint. You’ll want to pain the underside (inside) as well.

Finally, using the previously drilled holes as guides, I attached the window frame to the layout using the carriage bolts.

Supports

The arch frame was light enough so it doesn’t put undue stress on the layout structure, but as expected, it was a bit wobbly and lacked the internal structural strength to keep itself straight. I needed to brace the structure as well as attach it to the existing backdrop pieces.

I placed 1×3 pine pieces cut to length along the top and two sides. Standard wood glue secured the pieces to the arch. Fitting was done in place to insure clearance with existing scenery, side drops, structures, etc.

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Detail showing the back of the shadowbox fascia attached with angle brace to the Masonite sideboard.

 

I picked up some common metal corner braces at the local hardware store of about ½ inch long on each side. These were attached with the provided screws to the inside on the braces and side drops. These braces were a small detail, but probably did the most for keeping the sides stable and true.

Lighting

The lighting is provided by an off the shelf 18 inch fluorescent lighting fixture. I considered LED strips, but I wanted to keep the cost down for my first attempt. I actually tried various LED under – cabinet lighting fixtures, but they really weren’t bright enough. The fluorescent fixture was a nice compromise of cost vs. brightness. After verifying the supplied power cord would stretch to the edge of the layout, I attached the lighting fixture to the top 1×3 stiffener with the lamp screws that came in the package.

Southside Industrial proscenium arch from behind

Backside of proscenium arch showing 1×3 bracing and fluorescent light fixture

The fluorescent light left some dark spots on the edges of the layout, so I used some battery powered LED lights on the top edges of the frame. These come with a sticky attaching fixture, and can be angled as desired.

Finally, I attached a power strip to the under side of the layout. The light fixture as well as my DC power supply plug into the power strip. The power strip is plugged into the closest outlet.

Southside Industrial theater style proscenium arch

The Southside Industrial District with its theatre style proscenium arch complete. The final step will be to add some black skirting to hide the underneath storage and complete the effect.

The improvements to the layout have been fantastic. The proscenium arch and lighting really set off the layout within the room. Visitors are immediately drawn to the presentation of the trains. Plan on incorporating presentation in designing your next layout or add it to your current one. The results are worth it and you’ll be glad you did.


 

Literally. As part of the shadow box project, the grade has been moved from 28 inches off the floor to 43 inches. The following photos show the front fascia painted and attached to the lower version, as well as the leg work and the layout on the new higher legs.

 

Test fitting the front fascia shadow box

Test fitting the front fascia shadow box

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Southside shadow box legs

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Buildings on workbench, bench work legs, with painted shadow box in the background.

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Attaching the legs to the bench work.

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Southside Industrial District model railroad bench work with legs.

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Southside benchwork moved from 28 inch high horses to 43 inch legs.