Posts Tagged ‘city’

workbench 20190624

A quick coat of paint and some decals update this Chessie Bachmann GP40 just like the prototype

It may seems like I’m not making any visible progress on the Southside Industrial District model railroad, but there is a lot going on behind the scenes.

I’ve decided to put a “bookazine” together of my blog entries about the small switching layout, so I’ve been going back several years to 2011 and gathering all the resources and putting them together. The early articles I just wrote as blog entries – not to be put in print – and there was a lack of photos that accompanied them.

Also, the railroad is more complete now and I can show finished “after” scenes which just looks better.

Any modelling I’ve done, is to fill in gaps for photography or illustration purposes.

The Southside is in CSX country, but I had not one locomotive so designated – all of them are Chessie System models literally from the 80’s. But I did have some extra shells, so I painted one up over a weekend to place in pictures.

It was a quick and dirty job: the blue striping isn’t quite right and I only put decals on one side. Also for now there is no glass in the cab windows. I just wanted something to place on the background in the layout to give a rough sense of time and place.

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A GP35 still wearing Chessie System colors pulls a well car out of DuPont shipping track #5 on the Southside Industrial District

So, I’ve been detailing as well as going back and cleaning up and augmenting previous articles. Also, an article on operations is in the making and on the way.

I’m finding out that making a book of even previously written material is a lot of work, but I think it will be worth it to save and reflect on the best portions of my experience.

 

 

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Modeling the other side of the tracks need not send you to the poor house
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Simple details help set the scene on the Southside Industrial District HO scale switching model railroad

When you model the rough side of town, there are some businesses you might consider representing. I’ve chosen to include three on the backside of my layout. Commerce Street includes a car title loan business, a soup kitchen, and an abandoned apartment building. These buildings have been mostly cobbled together from extra parts and lived as glorified mock-ups in the background of my layout for a few years now. It was time to add some window glass, signs, and details to give these shops some character.

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The TitleMax building is painted a dark color with modern signage and placed on a back alley

TitleMax
Every depressed section of town needs a payday pawn shop. The source material for this shop came from an eBay lot that including what I finally identified as a Wathers Wallschlager’s Dealership. It is literally on a back alley on my pike, so I painted it a dark brown with no mortar to keep it simple and in the shadows. Other than that, I basically just added some signs from the internet, with some on the inside of the windows looking outward.

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Some left over wall pieces and a cardboard roof covered with sandpaper make the TitleMax building

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Simple details help the TitleMax building blend into the background in this alley scene on the HO scale Southside Industrial District

City Mission
This building is a deconstruction of the Art Curren “A. Frugill Co.” from a magazine article in the 1980’s. I originally built the building per the article’s instructions, but it wouldn’t fit on the current switching layout, so I took it apart and made two buildings out of it. The other building is a camping supply store on the front of the layout. Again, I didn’t have to do much more than add some window glazing, signs, graffiti, and clutter to the front of the building to turn this into a downtown soup kitchen. When searching for logos, I found a nice clear billboard, so I added that to the roof.

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An Art Curren kitbash from the 1980’s gets re-purposed as the Salvation Army city mission soup kitchen

Greenmont Apartments
This, too, is a leftover from an Art Curren project. I bought 3 of the Life-Like apartment buildings for his “Flatt Iron Co.” project the I ended up not building it and using two of the kits for Silvan Foods. The final kit I used for the Greenmont Apartments. I wanted to get some extra height beyond the three stories, so I added a half story basement from the Life-Like factory, which is the same size. I also used the backs of the three stories to create another story on top. I again choose a simple, dark paint color to keep the building non-assuming in the background.

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The Life-Like Belvedere hotel is used to model the back of an abandoned apartment building

The added height of the ground floor posed a problem with access to the front door. I eventually found some stairs in a junk box, but there was still not enough room to reasonably come out to the sidewalk. So, I rotated the stairs 90 degrees and left them a bit short of reaching the entrance. I decided this would be the abandoned backside of the building and the main entrance would remain unmodeled on the other side. It seems to work.

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Left: The back of each story was removed and used to create a fourth story. Wall sections from another Life-Like kit were used to make a split basement and give more height. Right: Boarded up windows, broken glass, screen mesh, and graffiti all contribute to making Greenmont Apartments feel abandoned.

I also wanted to add some tell-tale signs of an abandoned building. I used a few different modeling devices to achieve this. I boarded up some windows and doors, both from the inside and outside. Other windows were covered with screen mesh. Still other windows were broken, or left with no glazing at all. I added a few awnings, but not on every window. Everything was weathered with dry brushing, washes, and powders. Some graffiti and event posters can be found near the street level. A couple of construction workers sit on the steps eating their lunch, while a pick-up basketball game has started near by.

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More graffiti and event posters on the side of Greenmont Apartments. A basketball hoop will be added later.

These building were really cheap to do. They were mostly leftover walls and items from the scrap box, but even the complete structures I bought would be considered budget purchases. It is amazing what a few signs can do and just goes to show that you don’t need to spend a lot of money to give your town a bit of that “lived in” character.

Windows, signs, and details help a background building blend in
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Homemade signs and scrap box pieces bring an old downtown store front into the 21st century on the Southside Industrial District HO scale switching layout

All across the country, Main Street is coming back to life. Turn-of-the-century buildings are being renovated by boutiques as well as the big national chains seeking that homey feeling. It is not different down on the Southside, where model kits meant for the transition era are being brought into the 21st century.

The Southside Industrial District is a modern era industrial switching layout set in an office park on the what is now the outskirts of a major metropolitan area. The region has seen better days and now new and old exist side by side as the District tries to survive.

CommerceStreet

In this overall view of the Southside Industrial District, the old time five and dime department store stands out in the background, lacking proper windows, signage, and details

I had been photographing my layout and the unfinished retail store in the middle of Commerce Street kept appearing as a big white blob in the background. I’ve known for some time that I wanted a modern dollar store to go in there, so now was the time to jump in and do it.

The model itself I’ve had for a while from a winning lot auction on eBay. I had to lookup the specific building and it turns out it is a “JC Nickles” from DPM. I has been sitting on the layout for several years now with side walls (mostly unseen) from what I think is a Gruesome Casket Co from IHM and a red sandpaper roof. I had already painted and lightly weathered the model to my liking.

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The original DPM “J.C. Nickels” from an online auction lacking windows and detailing

The first step was to add glazing for the windows, which up until this point, had made the store front stand out and look incomplete. I found some clear plastic and sprayed one side with a matte finish to cloud up the windows. This makes them look dirty in the industrial setting, as well as hides the fact that the building is empty on the inside.

Next I searched the internet for signs for the type of business I wanted. I grabbed a few, as well as window signs and stickers, resized them for the appropriate space, and printed them out on a color printer with regular paper. I looked at real photos of stores and got signs that were typical. I even shrunk down the current week’s ad flyer! I simply affixed the posters to the back of the windows looking outward with white PVA glue that I knew would dry clear.

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Signs captured from the internet and printed on a color printer. Printing several sizes of each sign gives some flexibility when it comes time to add the signage to the building

The main sign is mounted on a piece of styrene cut to fit and glued in place with super glue. The canopy is from a scrapped Tyco #7885 freight depot from the 1970’s (that was a good investment!). A slightly newer Suydam Purina Chow feed mill donated the roof vents.

As suspected, the yellow sign was too bright and dominated the background. I toned it down by smudging some black and white acrylic paints over it with my finger. I found a few figures and placed them on the sidewalk in front of the building to set the scene.

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The finished dollar store in place with details and figures. If you zoom in, you can even see the store hours on the front door window!

It was nice to have a straightforward project for once that was completed in a week of stress free modeling in the evenings. By identifying some easy wins I was able to gain some motivation to head down to the basement. I even had a couple of quick operating sessions to keep my skills fresh.

So, if you are having trouble making progress on your layout, find a quick and easy project that is fun to give you some momentum.

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Rich Erwin freshens up the Southside Industrial District and addresses some nagging scenery issues

 

So, after a house move and some space prep, the time had come to clean things up a bit. I wanted to fix a couple of dings as a result of the move, enhance and correct some benchwork, and  tackle a couple of nagging issues with the scenery (paved areas).

First the benchwork. I reassembled the layout on its base legs. Since the new space isn’t finished yet, I had a pretty good inkling that I would be moving the layout a fair amount while things got sorted out. I turned the layout over, being carful to damage as little of the scenery as possible. Then I added 1/4″ center post casters I picked up from a big box home construction store. Flipped the layout back over and we were ready to go. The locking casters made a big improvement and maybe my best move yet.

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The District in its new space with rolling casters and an upgraded backdrop

 

Next up was the backdrop. For whatever reason, the current backdrop had about 1/2″ gap down the center. I don’t know if I originally measured wrong or what, but it had been like that for 3 or 4 years. Now was the time to fix it. I got a new 8′ section of 1/4″ Masonite and cut it to fit. It was long enough for a single piece to span the length of the back of the layout. I attached 1×3″ bracing to the back with Gorilla glue and painted the smooth side the same sky blue as the side boards. I attached it with clamps and drilled holes to match the existing holes in the frame. One quarter inch bolts with washers and wing nuts secured the backdrop to the benchwork frame.

On the backdrop I use photos of real scenes to fill the space between buildings. I still had the original backdrop and reference photos, so I peeled the photos off the backdrop and re-affixed them to the new backdrop. Another step done.

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Painting the backdrop

 

 

The sidewalks at the back of the layout needed attention, so that was my first modeling chore. It was pretty straightforward. I use .060″ styrene cut to fit for the raised sidewalks. and I scribed in expansion marks every 1 inch. I then added curbstones with a width of 1cm, rounded the corners at the intersections, and beveled for crosswalks and driveways. I follow that up with spray painting the sidewalkes with textured sandstone. I carved in some cracks and applied a dark wash for weathering (and to bring out the detail) which completes the work before I glue it in place.

On to the pavement issues. The paved areas consist of several materials. Most was either painted styrene or cardstock. At one point I used thin black card which was essentially black poster board without a sealed surface. This was mostly used in the Du Pont area. In an Georgia garage with no climate control, this thin and unsealed stock had warped in a few places, especially around the track rail. Also, on the west (left) side, there was no pavement under the track or up even with the railheads.

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Pavement redo with styrene at Du Pont

 

First on the list was the cardstock at Du Pont. I pulled the paper layer off, being careful to preserve the shape as a template for the new material. The bottom layer, even with the top of the ties, remained. I used a .030″ styrene stock and traced the piece of card on the styrene and cut to fit. I sprayed a base coat of black primer and then highlighted areas with gray to represent traffic patterns. I added some arrows and street markings with oil pastels and traffic templates (made for UK roads). Of the three sections, I replaced the two closest to the front of the layout and left the back section intact, as it is mostly hidden and in the best shape.

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Finished Du Pont section complete with road markings. Note the weathering indicating traffic patterns.

 

The paving on the west section was next. I did some research and wanted to try some differing techniques to see which provided better results. Three sections to process (plus between the rails), so for each I would try a different material. On the back section by Sylvan Foods, I used black foam core with the paper backing removed after soaking in water. The pieces were cut to fit and sanded. The resulting texture was a nice rough one, simulating a paved surface.

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Plaster used to fill in the space between spurs on the west end of the Southside Industrial District. Wax paper and painters’ tape protect the track work.

 

For the area between the tracks of National Transfer and Storage and Sylvan Foods, I took a page from the old-school plaster playbook. I needed 1/10 of an inch, plus the height of the ties, for code 100 track, so I applied in layers, let dry, sand, repeat. Finally I painted a coat of black/gray acryllic mix and added some chalk for weathering. This took a couple of weeks not necessarily would I call it messy, but I did feel that doing each layer was burdensome – having to repeat the cycle of wait and sand, wait and sand.

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Weights assure a good bond for the foam core paving onto the benchwork top

 

Finally back to foam core for the base under the National Transfer and Storage. I made it a little larger and shaped and sanded to fit the existing access road.

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The completed scene includes pavement made out of five different materials: card stock, foam core, styrene, craft foam, and plaster

 

So now these nagging little projects are done, I can get on to the next thing. We often forget that track is scenery, too, and with just this little bit of effort, the layout feels more complete, and has a more finished appearance. On to detailing the city!

Morden Station

Morden Station

The year has started off well with some good progress on my London Underground scene. I’m calling it Morden Diorama and using it as a proving ground for the upcoming exhibition layout based on the London Underground. More on the layout later in the year as progress develops.

I’ve chosen to model the London tube station “Morden”, which is at the end of the Northern Line. I purchased a cardstock kit of Morden station from Kingsway Models in UK – a firm that specializes in cardstock models and London Transport. The kits are OO scale which is 1/76 ratio, but uses the same track gauge as HO.

Working on Morden Station Diorama January 2016

Working on Morden Station Diorama January 2016

The kit comes with the pieces pre-printed on cardstock. I spent most of 2015 assembling the building – lots of cutting and gluing. Most of the model is finished, however I’ve got some details to add to get it to a higher level of completion.

I placed the building on a foundation of 0.06 styrene atop a standard sheet of black foam core purchased from a big box store. Using Google Maps, I determined the placement of sidewalks, medians, and pavement of the surrounding area. Again, I modeled all of these with 0.06 styrene. Some were painted with grey primer, while others were covered with texture sheets including a herringbone pattern for one of the walks.

Applying road markings to Morden Diorama

Applying road markings to Morden Diorama

Next came the road markings. I deliberated long about the method to use to create them. The straight lines would be simple enough to mask off, but other markings, especially text on the road, would be more complicated. I knew free hand would not yield clean and crisp results, and cutting a template from printed text would be just as difficult. I settled on some vinyl sheets of road markings from the UK manufacturer Scale Model Scenery. They were the perfect solution.

After watching my wife apply various media to black foam core, I settled on oil pastels. You can color over the template like crayons and then rub them in with your finger to fill in all the nooks and crannies. I works surprisingly well. With the ability to zoom in on Street View of Google maps to get correct placement, you can get a pretty convincing final effect.

Street View from Google Maps outside Morden Station in London

Street View from Google Maps outside Morden Station in London

That’s how far I have made it to date. Still to do are the hardware – railings, guardrails, lights; figures; and vehicles and some minor details. Then as a stage 2, I plan to model two levels below ground somewhat like the urban sculptor Alan Wolfson. Though not prototypical, I’ll model the station platforms and passenger cars (carriages) under ground.

So far, doing the research and modeling has been a fun project and should give me some good experience for the upcoming London Underground exhibition layout. Check back for progress updates.

 

 

2015 Progress 1

Southside Industrial District in shadowbox relief.

When 2015 started, I had three major goals to achieve for my HO industrial switching layout.

  • Create a shadow box (or proscenium) arch valence for the front of the layout benchwork
  • Convert an old Athearn diesel switcher to battery powered radio control
  • Build a cardstock model of the UK Underground station at Morden

I am pleased to say I made major progress on two, while considering the proscenium arch completed. Scroll down through the blog to see construction articles. More on the London Underground coming in 2016!

The proscenium arch

Southside Arch

Full frontal industrial switching

Battery powered radio control switcher

2015 Progress 2

Southside Industrial SW1500 #703 works the Dupont plant on the edge of the District

Radio control installed and working, but still some work to do on the shell – hand rails and weathering.

Morden Underground Station (OO Scale)

2015 Progress 3

Morden Station on the Northern Line of the UK Underground

While the bulk of Morden station is complete, I’d say the entire diorama is maybe 40% complete. I still have detailing to do like street markings, figures and general clutter. I’m also going add a couple of levels below grade to show some underground passenger service.

Rather ambitious, but I hope to get it done with a little help from my friends.

Beatles test with Morden Station

Zebra crossing dress rehersal.

Spring has spring down south and I’m able to get into the garage to work these days.

Working on the Railroad: My current workbench with the Southside Industrial District in the background.

Working on the Railroad: My current workbench with the Southside Industrial District in the background.

Here is what I have going on:

  1. Building a shadow box for the layout. The plywood for the front valance is actually acting as the workbench in the photo above.
  2. Re-powering an Athearn SW1500 with a Stanton drive. If I can get this in, I would like to eventually add battery power and radio control. You can see the original shell and Stanton drive on the test track
  3. An OO cardstock kit of a London Underground station for an upcoming diorama.

The warm weather definitely has the creative juices flowing.