Archive for May, 2019

Windows, signs, and details help a background building blend in
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Homemade signs and scrap box pieces bring an old downtown store front into the 21st century on the Southside Industrial District HO scale switching layout

All across the country, Main Street is coming back to life. Turn-of-the-century buildings are being renovated by boutiques as well as the big national chains seeking that homey feeling. It is not different down on the Southside, where model kits meant for the transition era are being brought into the 21st century.

The Southside Industrial District is a modern era industrial switching layout set in an office park on the what is now the outskirts of a major metropolitan area. The region has seen better days and now new and old exist side by side as the District tries to survive.

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In this overall view of the Southside Industrial District, the old time five and dime department store stands out in the background, lacking proper windows, signage, and details

I had been photographing my layout and the unfinished retail store in the middle of Commerce Street kept appearing as a big white blob in the background. I’ve known for some time that I wanted a modern dollar store to go in there, so now was the time to jump in and do it.

The model itself I’ve had for a while from a winning lot auction on eBay. I had to lookup the specific building and it turns out it is a “JC Nickles” from DPM. I has been sitting on the layout for several years now with side walls (mostly unseen) from what I think is a Gruesome Casket Co from IHM and a red sandpaper roof. I had already painted and lightly weathered the model to my liking.

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The original DPM “J.C. Nickels” from an online auction lacking windows and detailing

The first step was to add glazing for the windows, which up until this point, had made the store front stand out and look incomplete. I found some clear plastic and sprayed one side with a matte finish to cloud up the windows. This makes them look dirty in the industrial setting, as well as hides the fact that the building is empty on the inside.

Next I searched the internet for signs for the type of business I wanted. I grabbed a few, as well as window signs and stickers, resized them for the appropriate space, and printed them out on a color printer with regular paper. I looked at real photos of stores and got signs that were typical. I even shrunk down the current week’s ad flyer! I simply affixed the posters to the back of the windows looking outward with white PVA glue that I knew would dry clear.

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Signs captured from the internet and printed on a color printer. Printing several sizes of each sign gives some flexibility when it comes time to add the signage to the building

The main sign is mounted on a piece of styrene cut to fit and glued in place with super glue. The canopy is from a scrapped Tyco #7885 freight depot from the 1970’s (that was a good investment!). A slightly newer Suydam Purina Chow feed mill donated the roof vents.

As suspected, the yellow sign was too bright and dominated the background. I toned it down by smudging some black and white acrylic paints over it with my finger. I found a few figures and placed them on the sidewalk in front of the building to set the scene.

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The finished dollar store in place with details and figures. If you zoom in, you can even see the store hours on the front door window!

It was nice to have a straightforward project for once that was completed in a week of stress free modeling in the evenings. By identifying some easy wins I was able to gain some motivation to head down to the basement. I even had a couple of quick operating sessions to keep my skills fresh.

So, if you are having trouble making progress on your layout, find a quick and easy project that is fun to give you some momentum.

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